Course Information

for Pre-Theology Department


Old Testament (Bi 401)

Credits:2

Bi 401 Old Testament (2) This course provides an overview of the Old Testament as a collection of sacred and authoritative writings, discusses the Church's magisterial teachings on the nature and scope of Biblical theology, and presents central Biblical themes and concepts as well as methods used in the scholarly study of the Bible. new fall 2016 - kg

New Testament (Bi 402)

Credits:2

Bi 402 New Testament (2) This course provides an overview of the New Testament as a collection of sacred and authoritative writings, discusses the Church's magisterial teachings on the nature and scope of Biblical theology, and presents central Biblical themes and concepts as well as methods used in the scholarly study of the Bible. new fall 2016 - kg

Field Education (FE 401)

Credits:1

FE 401 Field Education (1) In each of their two years in the program, pre-theology students engage in a variety of preapproved and supervised pastoral field experiences that promote a spirit of selfless service and foster an awareness of key social issues. Each week, students come together for theological reflection upon their experiences. Credit/No Credit. Spring of year 1. new fall 2016 - kg

Field Education (FE 402)

Credits:1

FE 402 Field Education (1) In each of their two years in the program, pre-theology students engage in a variety of preapproved and supervised pastoral field experiences that promote a spirit of selfless service and foster an awareness of key social issues. Each week, students come together for theological reflection upon their experiences. Credit/No Credit. Fall of year 2. new fall 2016 - kg

Intro to New Testament Greek (Gk 383)

Credits:2

Gk 383 Introduction to New Testament Greek (1-4) Introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. Credit / No Credit. new fall 2016 - kg [ former description: Principles of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. Credit/No Credit. Not for graduate credit. Fall. UTD: 10/4/05, 3/10/08 ET ]

Intermediate New Testament Greek (Gk 384)

Credits:2

Gk 384 Intermediate New Testament Greek (1-4) Completion of grammar and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. Credit / No Credit. Prerequisite: Gk 383 or equivalent. new fall 2016 - kg [ former description: Completion of syntax and grammar. Readings from the New Testament. Credit/No Credit. Prerequisite: Gk 383 or equivalent. Not for graduate credit. Fall or Spring. UTD: 10/4/05, 3/10/08, 10/20/09 ET ]

Advanced New Testament Greek (Gk 385)

Credits:1

Advanced New Testament Greek Further readings from the New Testament. Credit/No credit. (Available for repetitive credit.) Prerequisite: Gk 384 or equivalent. Not for graduate credit. Fall or Spring. UTD: 10/4/05, 3/10/08, 10/20/09 ET

(1) Greek Language Studies (Gk 399)

Credits:1

MUST ENTER DESCRIPTION WHEN OFFERED. 10/4/05 ET

Biblical Greek: Grammar Review and Reading (Gk 399A)

Credits:2

Gk 399A Biblical Greek: Grammar Review and Reading (2) This course aims to build the student's ability to read and the New Testament in its original language. The first month consists of a grammar review using Basics of Biblical Greek Grammar. The remainder of the course involves reading and translating the Gospel of Mark. new indep study course spring 2017 - kg

Intermediate New Testament Greek (Gk384)

Credits:1

Intermediate New Testament Greek Completion of syntax and grammar. Readings from the New Testament. Credit/No Credit. Prerequisite: Gk 383 or equivalent. Not for graduate credit. Fall or Spring. UTD: 10/4/05 ET

Introduction to Hebrew (Hb 381)

Credits:2

Introduction to Hebrew Introduction to Hebrew orthography, phonology, morphology, and syntax. Credit/No Credit. Not for graduate credit. Fall. UTD: 10/4/05, 3/10/08 ET

Intermediate Hebrew (Hb 382)

Credits:1

Intermediate Hebrew Completion of syntax and grammar. Readings from the Old Testament. Credit/No Credit. Prerequisite: Hb 381 or equivalent. Not for graduate credit. Fall or Spring. UTD: 10/4/05, 3/10/08 ET

Advanced Hebrew (Hb 383)

Credits:1

Advanced Hebrew Further readings from the Old Testament. Credit/No credit. (Available for repetitive credit.) Prerequisite: Hb 382 or equivalent. UTD: 10/4/05, 3/10/08 ET

(3) Advanced Hebrew (Hb 383)

Credits:3

Advanced Hebrew Further readings from the Old Testament. Credit/No credit. (Available for repetitive credit.) Prerequisite: Hb 382 or equivalent. UTD: 10/4/05 ET

(2) Advanced Hebrew (Hb 383)

Credits:2

Advanced Hebrew Further readings from the Old Testament. Credit/No credit. (Available for repetitive credit.) Prerequisite: Hb 382 or equivalent. UTD: 10/4/05 ET

Introduction to Latin (Ln 381)

Credits:2

Ln 381 Introduction to Latin (1-4) This beginning course in Latin is designed to provide an introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of the Latin language and to Ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation. Credit/No Credit. new fall 2016 - kg [ former description: This beginning course in Latin is designed to provide an introduction to the Latin language: principles of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Credit/No Credit. Not for graduate credit. Fall. UTD: 10/4/05, DESIGNATED FOR FALL BUT PROBABLY EACH SPRING 10/20/09. ET ]

Intermediate Latin (Ln 382)

Credits:2

Ln 382 Intermediate Latin (1-4) Completion of Latin grammar and vocabulary. Credit/No Credit. Prerequisite: Ln 381 or equivalent. Not for graduate credit. Spring. UTD: 10/4/05 ET

Advanced Latin (Ln 383)

Credits:1

Advanced Latin Further readings from Latin texts. Credit/No Credit. (Available for repetitive credit.) Not for graduate credit. Fall or Spring. UTD: 10/4/05 ET

Latin Grammar/Church Fathers of the Fourth Century (Ln 399A)

Credits:1

Ln 399A Latin Grammar/Church Fathers of the Fourth Century (1) Further readings from Latin texts. A study of ecclesiastical Latin authors and councils of the fourth century including Arnobius, Ausonius, Lactantius, Hilary of Poitiers, Damasus I, Ambrose, Jerome, Augustine, Paulinus of Nola, Gregory of Elvira, and Vincent of Lerins. new course spring 2017 - kg 12/6/16

Aquinas: Latin Texts and Translations (Ln 399B)

Credits:1

Ln 399B - Aquinas: Latin Texts and Translations (1) A study of the Latin texts and translations of Thomas Aquinas, in particular the Summa Theologiae. Prerequisite: Ln 382. new course fall 2017 - kg 3/23/17

Liturgy and the Sacraments (Lt 405)

Credits:1

Lt 405 Liturgy and the Sacraments (1) Introduction to the liturgical and sacramental practices of the Catholic Church, including discussion of the Mass and the Missal, the Liturgy of the Hours, and the nature of the sacraments. It looks at the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Part Two. Fall.

Ancient Philosophy (Ph 401)

Credits:3

Ph 401 Ancient Philosophy (3) This course surveys philosophy as it developed in ancient Greece and became influential in the Patristic period (600 B.C.-800 A.D.). It treats the thought of Plato and Aristotle, examines other key movements such as Stoicism and Neo-Platonism, and discusses the appropriation of philosophy by early Christian authors such as Augustine. Fall. new fall 2016 - kg

Medieval Philosophy (Ph 402)

Credits:2

Ph 402 Medieval Philosophy (2) This course examines how philosophy evolved in the medieval and Renaissance Christian world (800-1600 A.D.). It examines the thought of key figures in the Scholastic and Humanist traditions. Prerequisite: Ph 401. Fall. new fall 2016 - kg

Modern Philosophy (Ph 403)

Credits:3

Ph 403 Modern Philosophy (3) This course examines the new movements that arose in the Modern and Enlightenment eras (1400-1900 A.D.) and the response of nineteenth-century philosophers. It includes coverage of seminal figures in the empirical, idealist, deist, positivist, romantic, spiritualist, and utilitarian traditions, and key Catholic thinkers of the nineteenth century. Prerequisites: Ph 401 and Ph 402. Spring. new fall 2016 - kg

Contemporary Philosophy (Ph 404)

Credits:2

Ph 404 Contemporary Philosophy (2) This course looks at the development of philosophy in the twentieth century (1900-2000 A.D.), including key figures in the movements of phenomenology, existentialism, Thomism, analytic philosophy, and postmodernism. Prerequisites: Ph 401, Ph 402, and Ph 403. Spring. new fall 2016 - kg

Logic (Ph 421)

Credits:2

Ph 421 Logic (2) Study of the logic of classical logic, including definitions, categorical propositions, syllogisms, truth tables, and fallacies; and modern logic, including Mills's methods, predicate logic, modal logic, the scientific method, and the linguistic analysis of names, descriptions, concepts, and statements. Fall. new fall 2016 - kg

Epistemology (Ph 422)

Credits:2

Ph 422 Epistemology (2) Study of the key theories of knowledge including the contrast between empiricism and rationalism, skepticism and realism, positivism and hermeneutics, and models of truth. Fall. new fall 2016 - kg

Philosophy of Nature (Ph 423)

Credits:2

Ph 423 Philosophy of Nature (2) Study of the fundamental nature of material reality, including discussion of substance, matter, primary versus secondary qualities, individuation, motion, space, time, causality, creation, and miracles. Fall. new fall 2016 - kg

Anthropology (Ph 424)

Credits:2

Ph 424 Anthropology (2) Study of philosophical views of the human person, including the nature of the body and soul, the appetites and passions, free will and determinism, vocation, predestination, immortality, happiness, and the meaning of life. Fall. new fall 2016 - kg

Ethics (Ph 425)

Credits:2

Ph 425 Ethics (2) Study of key theories of the moral life, including virtue ethics, natural law and the moral object, theological voluntarism, the nature of love and friendship, mitigating factors, casuistry, deontologism, utilitarianism, naturalism, and aesthetics. Spring. new fall 2016 - kg

Political Philosophy (Ph 426)

Credits:2

Ph 426 Political Philosophy (2) Study of key ideas in political thought, including church versus state relations, international law, just war theory, theories of punishment, Machiavellianism, contractualism, natural rights, legal positivism, liberalism, conservatism, and communism and socialism. Spring. new fall 2016 - kg

Metaphysics (Ph 427)

Credits:2

Ph 427 Metaphysics (2) Study of the ultimate nature of spiritual reality, including materialism versus idealism, essence and existence, potentiality and actuality, identity, the transcendentals, and the laws of thought. Spring. new fall 2016 - kg

Natural Theology (Ph 428)

Credits:2

Ph 428 Natural Theology (2) Reflection on arguments for the existence of God; the nature of God; the problem of evil; science and religion; and the credibility and nature of faith. Spring. new fall 2106 - kg

Aquinas (Ph 441)

Credits:2

Ph 441 Aquinas (2) This course consists of an in-depth look at the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas and its contemporary relevance. Fall. new fall 2016 - kg

Recent Catholic Philosophy (Ph 445)

Credits:2

Ph 445 Recent Catholic Philosophy (2) This course consists of an in-depth look at the thought of contemporary Catholic philosophers. Spring. new fall 2016 - kg

Special Studies in Philosophy (Ph 499)

Credits:1

Ph 499 Special Studies in Philosophy (1-4) Selected topics in Philosophy. Prerequisite: Recommendation of Academic Dean or Director of the Pre-Theology Program.

When Science Meets Religion (Ph 499B)

Credits:1

Ph 499B - When Science Meets Religion (1) This course searches for and then suggests the correct understanding of the relationship of science to Christianity by considering four possible models: conflict, independence, dialogue, and integration. Topics include evolution, creation, and neuroscience. Prerequisite: Permission of Academic Dean or Director of the Pre-Theology program. Note: This is an undergraduate level course; not available for graduate credit. new course spring 2017 - kg 10/3/16

Mind, Soul, and Thomas Nagel's Philosophy (Ph 499C)

Credits:2

Ph 499C Mind, Soul, and Thomas Nagel's Philosophy (2) St. Thomas Aquinas exploited pagan philosophy for his own theological ends. A theology student today can be, as Peter Kreeft called Fr. Norris Clark, a "little Thomas" by a similar exploitation. Consciously or unwittingly, all philosophy, insofar as it is in search of the truth, is in service to Theology, who uses such study as she sees fit. Philosophy is theology's servant. This course is a close study of Thomas Nagel's Mind and Cosmos: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature Is Almost Certainly False (2012) to mine its usefulness for contemporary theology. Spring 2017. - kg 11/22/16

Applied Ethics (Ph 499D)

Credits:1

Ph 499D Applied Ethics (1) Analysis of several key personal and social moral problems which may be taken from among the following: abortion, adultery, same sex marriage, contraception, guns, euthanasia, and war. new course fall 2017 - kg

Research Skills (Re 401)

Credits:1

Re 401 Research Skills (1) Introduction to the fundamentals of writing and referencing academic papers in philosophy and theology. Methods of library research are taught, with specific instruction in the use of online databases relevant to graduate level work in philosophy and theology. Credit/No Credit. Fall. new fall 2016 - kg [ formerly RSPT 401 ]

Introduction to Moral Theology (ThM 401)

Credits:2

ThM 401 Introduction to Moral Theology (2) This course introduces the methodology, nature, and foundational ideas in Christian ethics and moral theology, as well as particular moral and social teachings of the Catholic Church. It covers the Cathechism of the Catholic Church, Part III. Spring. new fall 2016 - kg

Catholic Heritage: The Early Church (ThSp 401)

Credits:3

ThSp 401 Catholic Heritage: The Early Church (3) An exploration of the interplay among theology, prayer, Catholic literature, and the arts from the Apostolic Church through the first eight ecumenical councils. Students consider significant ways that Greek language and culture influenced Christian life and belief, with reference to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Part One. Reciprocally, students discuss the various ways that the development of early Church belief and ways of life impacted the broader culture. Fall.

Catholic Heritage: The Rise of Medieval Culture (ThSp 402)

Credits:3

ThSp 402 - Catholic Heritage: The Rise of Medieval Culture (3 credits) This exploration of the spiritual, doctrinal, and cultural heritage of the Catholic tradition from the mid-fourth century into the eleventh century introduces students to the influence of Roman Catholic spiritualities and doctrines on the interplay of spirituality, music, art, and literature. Through primary and secondary sources, students study how culture depends on worship, literacy, and time for leisure as they are exposed to different traditions of Christian prayer, meditation, and contemplation that emerged in this period. Prerequisite: ThSp 401. Spring. [ former title Catholic Heritage from Dark Ages to Middle Ages - changed 6/21/17 - kg ]

Catholic Heritage: Early Renaissance to Enlightenment (ThSp 403)

Credits:3

ThSp 403 Catholic Heritage: Early Renaissance to the Enlightenment (3) This course focuses on the influences of empirical science, vernacular languages, economic and commercial progress, and the Protestant and Catholic Reformations on the development of Catholic heritage. Students discuss the impact and interplay of doctrine, worship, prayer, Catholic literature, and the arts on Christian life and belief from the end of the medieval world until the mid-nineteenth century. They also study how the Christian faith and way of life continued to influence society and culture. Prerequisites: ThSp 401 and ThSp 402. Fall. new course effective fall 2017 - kg

Catholic Heritage: Modern Times (ThSp 404)

Credits:3

ThSp 404 Catholic Heritage: Modern Times (3) Students survey the interplay among doctrine, worship, Catholic literature, and the arts from the mid-nineteenth century through the post-Vatican II conciliar developments. Students relate a developing understanding of human nature in Catholic belief and practice to societal changes and scientific beliefs arising in the modern period. Prerequisites: ThSp 401, ThSp 402, and ThSp 403. Spring. new course effective spring 2018 - kg