Course Information

 

for Biblical Studies Department


Genesis - Kings (Bi 504)

Credits:3

The course presumes a working background in foundational aspects of biblical exegesis and hermeneutics. Students without BiPT 401-402 (SJS Pre-Theology or an equivalent course) will receive directed readings to facilitate their catching up. The class sessions will move in canonical order from Genesis to 2 Kings. Each book will be studied in the sequence of 1) overview, 2) exegesis of selected pericopes, and 3) theological messages. The course ends with a synthesis of great themes and motifs in the Pentateuch and Historical Books of the OT. Pre-requisites: BiPT 401 and BiPT 402 or equivalent. Fall. Created on 1/28/08 ET Revised on 6/24/09 ET (2009 catalogue)

Synoptic Gospels w Methodology (Bi 513)

Credits:3

The course begins with the life and ministry of Jesus and the development of the Synoptic tradition. Mark, Matthew, and Luke-Acts are then studied with emphasis on the historical situation, structure, and theological themes of each work. During some semesters, this course is also offered in Spanish. Prerequisite: Bi 523. Fall. 9/30/05 ET

Pauline Literature (Bi 523)

Credits:3

The letters of St. Paul interpreted in the light of Paul's religious experience, his theological language, and the situation of the Christian communities to which he wrote; special attention to main Pauline themes and their meaning for today; the deutero-Pauline letters as an interpretation of Paul by the next Christian generation. Prerequisite: Bi 503. Spring. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

Johannine Literature (Bi 533)

Credits:2

Study of the Fourth Gospel and Johannine Epistles, with emphasis on both the life situation of the Johannine community and the relevance of Johannine theology to contemporary spirituality; guided work on the Book of Revelation and its particular message. Spring. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

The Prophets (Bi 563)

Credits:3

The course provides an examination of prophecy in ancient Israel. After an overview of the ancient Near Eastern context and of the origins of prophecy in Israel, the course examines the historical milieu and theologies of the classical prophets, beginning with the eighth-century prophets and concluding with the post-exilic prophets. Prerequisite: Bi 504. Fall. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

The Psalms and Wisdom Literature (Bi 572)

Credits:2

The course first investigates the literary artistry of biblical poetry, the formation of the Psalter, types of psalms, and the theologies evidenced in the Psalter and other biblical poetic texts. The course then studies wisdom in the ancient Near East and the historical, literary, and theological legacy of wisdom in the Hebrew Bible and Deuterocanonical literature from its early stages to the Hellenistic period. Prerequisite: Bi 503 Spring. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

The Parables of Jesus (Bi 580)

Credits:2

The parables are explored as a key vehicle in understanding Jesus' experience and proclamation to the reign of God and in actualizing "kingdom consciousness" today. The course explores the original form and setting of Jesus' parables, their redaction in the Gospel tradition, the history of parable interpretation in the Church, and contemporary reflection on the parables in prayer and preaching. Prerequisite: Bi 513. Spring 2008. UTD: 10/31/07 ET/jg

Biblical Themes of Justice (Bi 581)

Credits:2

From beginning to end, the Bible provides a spectrum of themes that relate to contemporary issues of justice: creation and ecology (stewardship), oppression and liberation (exodus), prophetic denunciation of injustice, human dignity and its denial, and God-inspired visioning of the right relationship between God, humanity, and creation (Jesus' reign of God, Pauline new creation in Christ). The course will explore models of relating these themes to current social issues and to perennial issues of justice and human dignity. Prerequisite: Bi 503. Spring 2010. UTD: 10/31/07 ET/jg

Models of Biblical Interpretation (Bi 583)

Credits:2

Models of Biblical Interpretation This seminar allows students to explore ancient and modern models of biblical interpretation and their theological and pastoral impact. Included in the first part of the course are analysis of patristic exegesis, the impact of historical-critical method, and feminist "hermeneutics of suspicion." The focus of the second part of the course will be determined by student interest. Prerequisite: Foundational course in biblical studies required, subject to judgment of professor. Fall 2007. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

OT Theology: Theory, Method & Themes (Bi 585)

Credits:2

Old Testament theology is an exciting area of study because it develops not out of one point of view but in a myriad of tensions and difficulties. The seminar begins with an investigation of the history of Old Testament theology, as well as its theories and methods. The seminar continues with the study of various topics of interest selected by the professor and the students. Topics include material from the Deuterocanonical literature. Prerequisite Bi 503 and Bi 513. Spring 2010. UTD: 10/20/09 ET

Multicultural Readings from Scriptures (Bi 586)

Credits:2

Multicultural Readings From The Scriptures People from different cultures can read the same biblical passage and arrive at different conclusions about its ultimate meaning. This elective explores these phenomena, giving the students the opportunity to recognize how cultural starting points affect interpretation. The course will study a variety of non-Western, non-European, and non-traditional analyses of passages taken from the Hebrew Bible, Deuterocanonical Literature, and the New Testament to learn about their distinct cultural perspectives and discuss them in what will be hopefully a multicultural classroom setting. Pre-requisite: Bi 503 Fall 2008. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

Between the Testaments: Lit... (Bi 589)

Credits:2

Between the Testaments: Literature from the Later Exilic Period to the Birth of Christianity (2) An often neglected area in Biblical Studies is the rich deposit of literature that emerged in the few centuries before and after the birth of Christ. Jewish literature from this period includes the deuterocanonical books (1-2 Maccabees, Judith, Tobit, Baruch, Sirach, and the Wisdom of Solomon) that form part of the Catholic canon, as well as numerous extracanonical works. This literature is important for understanding the history and thought of Jews in the time when Christianity was emerging. This course will briefly survey the historical background and types of literature involved, followed by the close reading of selected texts from the deuterocanonical books mentioned above. Some attention will also be given to literature that circulated during this period but did not become part of the Jewish or Christian canon. Prerequisite: Bi 503 Spring 2010. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

Apocalyptic Literature (Bi 590)

Credits:2

Apocalyptic Literature (2) Apocalyptic literature is distinguished by fantastic language, the mediation of heavenly beings, and the disclosure of a supernatural and eschatological world. Revelation is found in visions, hidden scrolls, and other worldly journeys. This course will examine the apocalyptic genre, including language, setting, and theological perspectives. Sections from the Book of Daniel and some related extrabiblical literature (for example, Enoch, Qumran scrolls) will be discussed. The Book of Revelation will also be examined for its view of history and the central role of Christ. Prerequisite: Bi 503 or equivalent foundational course in biblical studies, subject to the professor's approval. Spring 2009. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

Special Studies in Biblical Studies (Bi 599)

Credits:2

Special Studies in Biblical Studies (1-3) Selected topics in Biblical Studies. Specific course descriptions and course syllabus must be on file with the Academic Dean. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

Jewish Background to New Testament (Bi 599a)

Credits:2

Christianity arose as a sect of Judaism in the first decades of the first century of the Christian Era. The geographical setting of the Gospel is the Land of Israel. Its historical context is Judaism and the Jewish People under the rule of the Pagan Roman Empire. The earliest writers of the Gospels spoke and wrote Hebrew and Jewish Aramaic. Early Christians drew on Jewish traditions and the Prophets of the Hebrew Bible for their inspiration and the fundamentals of their faith. As we read the New Testament we are ever more impressed with the fact that we are in the Jewish world of the first century. This course will examine the writings of the New Testament and see them in the context of the Judaism in which they grew and developed. Required Biblical elective or MDiv/MA elective. Must enter revised description when offered again. ET

(2)Non-Pauline Literature (Bi 599b)

Credits:2

La Prima Petri y los Otros Ecritos Católicos: La Primera carta de Pedro puede ser definida como un breve tratado sobre la vocación cristiana. Es un escrito de gran riqueza que concierne la Teologia Fundamental. Sin embargo, esta carta de finales del primer siglo cristiano, ha estado abandonado por la sciencia biblica y has sido considerado "la Cenicienta" de la exégesis moderna. Una prueba de ello es que raras veces aparece en los programas de estudios universitarios. Este año nos proponemos estudiar esta escrito bajo el áulo de la justificación de la esperanza cristiana en un contexto adverso a la fe. De hecho, los creyentes del Asia Menor, corrían el riezgo de perder la fe y de cesar de confesar el Nombre del Jesucristo a causa de la confrontación de la fe con el mundo pagano. Este escrito es útil para los creyentes del signo XXI que están llamados a ser cristianos dentro del mundo, en plena tención y en dialogo permanente con él. A partir de la problematica de la Primera de Pedro iremos a estudiar la Segunda y las otras cartas católicas: Judas, Santiago y las tres cartas de San Juan. Estudiaremos el contexto histórico de cada carta y el mensaje teologico de cada una de ellas. Tendremos la preoccupación de harcer relectura (hermenéutica) del mensaje teológico de cada escrito. Must enter revised description when offered again. ET

Matthew/Luke Seminar (Bi 599c)

Credits:2

Must enter description when offered. ET

Multicultural Readings... (Bi 599d)

Credits:2

Title: Multi-Cultural Readings from This Place Description: People from different cultures can read the same Biblical passage and arrive at different conclusions about its ultimate meanings. Bi 599 will explore this phenomena, giving the students the opportunity to recognize how cultural starting points affect interpretation. This course will study a variety of non-Western, non-European, and non-traditional analyses of passages taken from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, to learn about their own cultural perspectives, and to discuss them in what will hopefully be a multi-cultural classroom setting. Required Biblical elective or MDiv/MA elective. Must enter revised description when offered again. ET

The Cultural World of Jesus (Bi 599e)

Credits:2

Every venture into the study of the scriptures, when done critically, is an encounter with the "other." The scriptures all reflect the theology, culture, and religious aspirations of ancient peoples, long dead. In this course, the students will study the world behind the writings of the New Testament, representing the rich cultural mix of first century Judaism and Greco-Roman Hellenism. In coming to appreciate this world so different from and yet so important to our own, the participants will be asked to consider anew, the way in which their own cultural identification, and that of their fellow students, color the reading of the text. The deliberate intent is to aid the student to recognize the gifts each culture brings to faith and the need each culture has of conversion and redemption. No pre-requisites. Created for Spring 2009. 10/28/08 ET

Morality, Sacred Scripture & War (Bi 599F)

Credits:2

Must enter description when offered.

Israel/Yehud in the Persian Period (Bi 599g)

Credits:2

This two credit seminar offers an opportunity to investigate a previously neglected but now lively area of discussion regarding the intertestamental period. Modern socio-cultural methods help us read more intelligently the social and demographic issues that surrounded the emergence of early Judaism and move beyond the theological readings evidenced in biblical texts (Ezra-Nehemiah, etc). Using one primary text and several secondary texts and journal articles, the student will research the current state of the question and compare shared and disparate readings among several scholars. Prerequisite: Bi 503 or equivalent. Must enter revised description when offered again. ET

Moral Theology & the Scripture (Bi 599h)

Credits:2

F05 Secondary Title: Poverty, Ethics & Scripture Generic Description: This course explores through a historical-critical approach the intimate connection between moral behavior and divine revelation in the Scriptures. The renewal of moral theology called for in the Vatican II document Optatam Totius challenges moral theology to recover its biblical foundations. Therefore a comparison of magisterial moral teachings, traditional Roman Catholic methods (especially natural law) and Protestant moral methodologies, and the bible will be the focus of this course. Prerequisites: Bi 503 and ThM 514. This course may be used to fulfill the biblical studies elective requirement. MDiv or MA elective. Fall 2004, 2005, 2006. Pre-Req: Bi 503 & ThM 514. Enrollment Maximum: 8 Must enter revised description when offered again. ET

Gospel Passion Narratives (Bi 599i)

Credits:2

Bi 599i Gospel Passion Narratives (2 units) The Death of Jesus: This seminar will explore in depth the gospel accounts of the Passion of Jesus. The course will set the Passion narratives in the context of the particular theology of each of the four canonical gospels. Prerequisites: Bi 503. MDiv/MA elective Course first offered in F05. UTD: 9/30/05 ET

(3)Greek Grammar & Reading (a) (Bi 599is)

Credits:3

Must enter description when offered. ET

Understanding Biblical Themes... (Bi 599J)

Credits:2

Title: Understanding Biblical Themes: Exile, Exodus, & Freedom Must enter description when offered. Created: 9/28/05 for S06. ET

Deuteronomy (Bi 599k)

Credits:2

Bi Hermeneutics for Moral Meth (Bi 599L)

Credits:2

Biblical Hermeneutics for Moral Methodology. (Cross-listed as: ThM 584 Moral Theology and the Scripture) This course explores through a historical-critical approach the intimate connection between moral behavior and divine revelation in the Scriptures. The renewal of moral theology called for in the Vatican II document Optatam Totius challenges moral theology to recover its biblical foundations. Therefore a comparison of magisterial moral teachings, traditional Roman Catholic methods (especially natural law) and Protestant moral methodologies, and the bible will be the focus of this course. Prerequisites: Bi 503 and ThM 514. This course may be used to fulfill the biblical studies elective requirement. Created 2/24/06. ET NO REVISIONS. F2010. 2/22/10 ET

Biblical Hermeneutics (Bi 599M)

Credits:2

Modern Approaches to Interpreting Scripture. Maximum enrollment: 8 students for round table seminar 2 unit course created on 9/27/10 (Use this course with different course topics/descriptions). Sp 2011

Evolution of Central Ideas of Bible (Bi 599N)

Credits:2

The Evolution of Selected Central Ideas of the Bible This course traces the development of selected central ideas of scripture, from earliest times through the end of the biblical period and on into the classical rabbinic era. We seek to discover in this study (1) a picture of the evolutionary character of biblical theology, (2) the normative rabbinic adaptations of the biblical ideas, and (3) the divergent versions of these ideas on the part of Judaism and Christianity. Topics to be explored are (I) The Idea of God, (II) The Idea of Man, (III) The Idea of Immortality. Pre-requisites: None Created for S12. 10/19/11 ET

Dead Sea Scrolls (Bi 599O)

Credits:2

This seminar will be an introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls, which began to be discovered at Qumran in the Judean Desert in 1947. Since that time the study of these documents along with archaeological digs at the site have reshaped our ideas about the Bible, Judaism, and the historical context out of which both the Christian Church and Rabbinic Judaism grew. The class will be largely discussion-based with a significant amount of reading for each class. Each student will do a presentation on a selected document and a final research paper. Class size: no more than 8-10 students. Some Hebrew is preferred but not required. Pre-requisites: Bi 504 & bI 513. CREATED ON 10/12/12 ET

God Idea: Its Evolution from Bible (Bi 599P)

Credits:2

Title: The God Idea: Its Evolution from the Bible Since God is the central factor in the religious enterprise, this course seeks to help us to more fully grasp the God idea as embraced by Judaism and Christianity. Among the questions we shall attempt to respond to: . Can we prove the existence of God? . Why is monotheism so important? . When in history did the idea of the One God emerge: in the era of the Patriarchs or in the time of Moses? . What was the contribution of the Prophets in the expansion of this idea? . What did Rabbinic Judaism do to hone the God idea? . How did Christianity understand this idea? . In what ways do Judaism and Christianity differ on the matter? What difference does it make? . What do we mean by a "Personal God" ? These questions will surface and confront us as we trace the God idea in Scripture from earliest times through the end of the Biblical period, as we proceed from there to the classical Rabbinic (inter-testamental) era, and into the period of Christianity. The course provides the relevant readings culled from the original sources, text based lectures, and features class discussion, exchange of ideas, the airing of diverse perspectives - and homilies for each session designed to illume the role and presence of god in our midst. Prerequisite: None M.Div/MA Elective CREATED FOR FALL 2013. 4/10/13 ET

Reading O.T. as Christian Scripture (Bi 599Q)

Credits:2

Reading the Old Testament as Christian Scripture Given the Ancient Near Eastern context and obviously Jewish character of the Old Testament, how is it possible to speak of it as part of the Christian canon of Scripture? While nodding respectfully and appreciatively toward the many legitimate Jewish readings of the text, this course explores how a Christian hermeneutic can function in our two-testamented Bible. Are Christians simply "reading someone else's mail," or can we say that these books are ours as well? PRE-REQS: BI 504 & BI 523 Created on 10/31/13 for S14. ET

Lectura Pastoral del Evangelio Segun San Marcos (Bi 599R)

Credits:2

Bi 599R Lectura Pastoral del Evangelio Segun San Marcos (2) Como el nombre lo dice, este curso ofrece los elementos necesarios para aprovechar el segundo Evangelio de forma adecuada y fácil de aplicar en el ejercicio pastoral. El curso responde muy bien a la pregunta cómo formar discípulos y misioneros hoy? Además del material básico, cada capítulo contiene análisis de textos concretos. Note: Open to all students, but course will be taught in Spanish. Note: Cross-listed with PS 599R. May be taken for either Biblical Studies credit or Pastoral Studies credit. created for spring 2016 - kg 10/29/15

Hermeneutics and Inspiration (Bi 599S)

Credits:2

Bi 599S Hermeneutics and Inspiration (2) This course focuses primarily on hermeneutics, the branch of theology concerned with identifying and applying sound principles of biblical interpretation. Given that the Bible was written over a period of roughly two millennia by forty or more authors using three different languages (Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek), proper interpretation requires careful study. The authors wrote in different genres and had different vocabularies, personalities, cultural backgrounds, and social standings. The Holy Spirit moved each of these men to produce His inspired, inerrant, and infallible Word (2 Timothy 3:16; 2 Peter 1:20–21), but He also allowed their various writing styles and personalities to be expressed in its pages. In addition, the Bible was written in a culture very different from the modern world, and it has been translated from its original languages. Students are encouraged, therefore, to seek the guidance of the Holy Spirit while studying the Bible so that their understanding of Scripture is not distorted (2 Peter 3:16). Students are introduced to the senses of Scripture (noematic), criteria and support for determining the sense (heuristic), and Sacred Scripture in the Christian life (prophoristic). To be sure, human authors wrote the texts, but the Bible originated as an action of God who breathed it out. Because “all Scripture is inspired,” the course also focuses on the nature of divine inspiration, which may be defined as “God’s superintendence of the human authors of Scripture so that using their own individual personalities, they composed and recorded without error His revelation to man in the words of the original autographs.” Topics include: the Spirit of God, full of power and freedom; the Spirit of God in the revelation of events and words; Scripture inspired by God; the truth in Scripture; revelation in history and through history; and theological and pastoral implications. A brief systematic study of the Dogmatic Constitution Dei Verbum is also included. A major goal of the course is to prepare students whose future work will specifically be to worthily and competently provide and explicate the Word of God, divinely inspired. Note: Course is taught in Spanish. new fall 2016 - kg 4/7/16

Gospel of Mark (Bi 599T)

Credits:2

Bi 599T Gospel of Mark (2) A research seminar concerning the possibility of a suspended conclusion of the Gospel of Mark at Mk 16:8. The course explores the research done by different scholars about whether or not there is a missing ending and the impact of the extant conclusion on the audience, past and present. created fa 16 - kg 8/22/16

Paul's Epistle to the Romans (Bi 599U)

Credits:2

Bi 599U - Paul's Epistle to the Romans (2) This course is a critical study of Paul’s epistle to the Romans. In addition to a careful reading of the text, students examine important historical events pertinent to Romans and study elements of the Greco-Roman and Jewish milieu behind the epistle. The class also surveys major trends in the interpretation of Romans, including discussion of a) Paul’s use of the Scriptures of Israel and b) specific pastoral issues that Paul faces in writing to the Roman churches. new course spring 2017 - kg 10/5/16

Biblical Synthesis (Bi 599V)

Credits:2

Exodus: Israel in the Wilderness (Bi 599X)

Credits:2

Bi 599X Exodus: Israel in the Wilderness (2) This course explores the Exodus, the Passover, the Covenant at Sinai, the Tabernacle, miracles, Israel’s rebellion as recounted in Exodus and Numbers, the crossing of the Red Sea and the Jordan, and the importance of the desert theme in the Elijah narrative and in Isaiah 40-66. new course sp 2017 - kg 9/26/16

Paul's Epistle to the Galatians (Bi 599Y)

Credits:2

Bi 599Y - Paul's Epistle to the Galatians (2) This course is a study of Paul’s epistle to the Galatians using the English text. A thorough knowledge of Galatians and basic methods of interpretation are invaluable for ministry, especially teaching and preaching. Specifically, Galatians contains the seeds of more developed elements in Catholic faith and evidences a complex pastoral situation faced by Paul the Apostle which has elements analogous to the challenges faced in parishes today. new course fall 2017 - kg 3/27/17

A Biblical, Spiritual, and Pastoral Reading of the Book of Revelation (Bi 599Z)

Credits:2

Bi 599Z - A Biblical, Spiritual, and Pastoral Reading of the Book of Revelation (2) Many people are afraid to read the book of Revelation. Most of them prefer to stay with a pious and superficial interpretation. It is really the most difficult but most fascinating book of the Bible. History, revelation, prophecy, and prophetic reading of history are combined there in a masterful and exciting way. The Book of Revelation had its origin in a time of crisis, but it remains valid and meaningful for Christians of all time. In the face of apparently insuperable evil, either from within or from without, all Christians are called to trust in Jesus’ promise, “Behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age” (Mt 28:20). Those who remain steadfast in their faith and confident in the risen Lord need have no fear. Suffering, persecutions, even death by martyrdom, though remaining impenetrable mysteries of evil, do not comprise an absurd dead end. No matter what adversity or sacrifice Christians may endure, they will in the end triumph over Satan and his forces because of their fidelity to Christ, the victor. This is the enduring message of the book; it is a message of hope, consolation, and challenge for all who dare to believe. Students have a valuable opportunity to carefully read and understand this beautiful book, extracting from it a wonderful message of hope. This exploration aims at the capacity to present this Biblical wisdom adequately and understandably to the people of God desirous of appropriating its meaning into their lives. Note: This course will be taught in Spanish. new course spring 2017 - kg 10/4/16

Choose a Biblical Studies elective (Bi elect)

Credits:2

(Cr) Issues in Gospel of Matthew (Bi582 is)

Credits:2

Issues in the Gospel of Matthew: Particular areas for attention are the Synoptic Sayings Source (Q), Matthew's infancy narrative, the Sermon on the Mount and Matthean ethics, and Matthew's theology of God's fidelity to Israel. The course will also acquaint the student with samples of contemporary methods in Gospel study, specifically redaction criticism, narrative criticism, and post-modern interpretation. Prerequisites: Bi 503 and Bi 513 Required Biblical elective or MDiv/MA elective. Spring 2000. Inactive: 9/30/05 ET

(3)Greek Grammar & Reading (b) (Bi599isb)

Credits:3

Must enter description when offered. ET

Church: Uganda 1879-2000 (CH 599C)

Credits:2

Must enter description when offered. ET